Cluny Brown (Ernst Lubitsch, 1946)

71SqtZKf9-L._SL1500_“Ernst Lubitsch’s final finished film is a deceptively lighthearted exploration of class and gender issues in Britain on the brink of World War II.”

I review the AV quality and bonus materials on Criterion’s recent release over at Slant Magazine.

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An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)

americanwerewolfinlondonbr“John Landis’s landmark horror-comedy gets the deluxe Blu-ray treatment, with a colorful new transfer, as well as a pack of new bonus materials.”

Read my entire review of this new title over at Slant Magazine.

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The Devil Rides Out (Terence Fisher, 1968)

81CB4gLTC2L._SL1500_“Terence Fisher’s standout Hammer Films horror title gets a sterling Blu-ray transfer and a satisfyingly comprehensive slate of bonus features.”

Read my review of the AV quality and extras for this release over at Slant Magazine.

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The 50 Greatest Horror Movies of the 21st Century

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Here’s a revised and updated version of this list, to which I contributed 5 capsule reviews as well as the introduction.

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The 20 Best Zombie Movies of All Time

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I contributed 7 capsule reviews to this list at Slant Magazine.

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And Soon the Darkness (Robert Fuest, 1970)

andsoonthedarkness1970br“Robert Fuest’s And Soon the Darkness is a taut, precision-crafted Hitchcockian thriller, drawing particular inspiration from one of the master of suspense’s most famous sequences: the crop-duster scene in North by Northwest. Like that now-classic set piece, Fuest’s film builds an escalating sense of menace and imminent danger from a confrontation with a location’s wide open spaces and bright sunshine. Only here the setting is rural France, and we’re accompanying two English girls on an ill-fated cycling holiday.”

Read my entire review on Slant Magazine.

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WHO SAW HER DIE? (Aldo Lado, 1972)

whosawherdie“The early 1970s brought us two thrillers with all of the following elements: an estranged couple mourning the tragic death of a daughter; a grief-stricken sex scene crosscut with glimpses of its doleful aftermath; a series of murders occurring against the backdrop of Venice in the offseason; and a canal-bound funeral in a black-draped barge. The more famous, of course, is Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now. The other is Aldo Lado’s less acknowledged giallo film Who Saw Her Die? But the real surprise here, given the Italian film industry’s not entirely undeserved reputation for the quick cash-in and cheapjack rip-off, is that Who Saw Her Die? actually came out first.”

Read the rest of my review of Aldo Lado’s surprisingly elegiac giallo at Slant Magazine.

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