Twin Peaks: The Return Recap, “Part 3”

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“The first 15 minutes of part three of Twin Peaks: The Return play like one of David Lynch’s hermetically sealed surrealist short films. Agent Cooper’s (Kyle MacLachlan) plunge through space-time comes to an abrupt end when he crash-lands on a rivet-studded metal balcony overlooking a dark purple sea.”

Read my recap of Twin Peaks: The Return, “Part 3” at The House Next Door.

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap, “Parts 1 & 2”

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“Just like that gum you like, Twin Peaks is back in style. And that style is unadulterated, late-period David Lynch. Sometimes it’s the casting of seemingly minor parts, sometimes just a bit of stray imagery, but Lynch and co-creator Mark Frost somehow manage to evoke moments from Lost Highway and, in particular, Mulholland Drive at least as often as they do the original TV series, which ran on ABC from 1990 to 1991.”

Read my first recap of Twin Peaks: The Return for The House Next Door, the official blog of Slant Magazine.

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Twin Peaks: Every Episode Ranked

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“On April 8, 1990, ABC broadcast the pilot episode of Twin Peaks, cult filmmaker David Lynch’s initial foray into network television. Lynch tapped co-creator Mark Frost, who had made his bones writing teleplays for edgy yet realistic fare like Hill Street Blues, to ensure a sturdy dramatic backbone was securely in place for a series Lynch was wont to describe as ‘Peyton Place on acid.'”

For Slant Magazine, I rank and (more importantly) write about every episode of Twin Peaks from Seasons 1 and 2.

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When Gothic Meets Giallo: Emilio P. Miraglia’s The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave and The Red Queen Kills Seven Times

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“Throughout the 1960s and into the mid-1970s, two very different kinds of films dominated the Italian horror genre, each accompanied by their own distinctive iconographies. The gothic style is frequently associated with the remote past, cobweb-strewn castles, and ancestral curses, while giallo films emphasize the perils of modernity, and usually feature a masked and black-gloved killer picking off unsuspecting, albeit not always entirely undeserving, victims.”

Read the entire article on The House Next Door, the official blog of Slant Magazine.

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Ophelia (Claude Chabrol, 1963)

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“Claude Chabrol’s ironic and elegiac take on Shakespeare’s Hamlet makes its Region A Blu-ray debut with a gorgeous transfer and little else.”

Read the review over at Slant Magazine.

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Caltiki, the Immortal Monster (Riccardo Freda and Mario Bava, 1959)

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“Italian maestros of the macabre Riccardo Freda and Mario Bava team up for a curious (and sometimes unwieldy) fusion of sci-fi and gothic horror elements.”

Read the review on Slant Magazine.

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Tampopo (Juzo Itami, 1985)

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“Juzo Itami’s “ramen western” Tampopo is a zesty concoction that investigates the often surreal intersections of sex, death, and other human appetites.”

Read the rest of the review at Slant Magazine.

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